How to Watch Pro Football Hall of Fame Induction Online Without Cable

The Pro Football Hall of Fame welcomes eight new members during Saturday’s induction ceremony, as NFL legends Ray Lewis, Randy Moss, Brian Urlacher, Brian Dawkins, Terrell Owens, Robert Brazile, Bobby Beathard and Jerry Kramer make up the stacked 2018 class.

The HOF enshrinement ceremony begins at 7 p.m. ET and will be broadcast nationally on both NFL Network and ESPN. If you don’t have cable or can’t get to a TV, you can watch a live stream of the ceremony (or DVR it, or watch it on-demand later) on your computer, phone or streaming device by signing up for one of the following cable-free, live-TV streaming service:

FuboTV

NFL Network is included in the main “Fubo Premier” channel package. You can sign up for a free 7-day trial right here, and you can then watch a live stream of the induction ceremony on your computer via the FuboTV website, or on your phone, tablet or streaming device via the FuboTV app.

Additionally, if you can’t watch live, FuboTV also comes with 30 hours of Cloud DVR (with the ability to upgrade to 500 hours). And if you sign up late or forget to record the ceremony, it also comes with a “72-Hour Lookback” feature, which allows you to watch the induction ceremony up to three days after it airs.

Hulu With Live TV

If you’re looking for the best live sports plus entertainment package, Hulu, in addition to its massive libary of on-demand movies and TV shows, also offers a bundle of 50-plus live TV channels, which includes ESPN. You can sign up for “Hulu with Live TV” right here, and you can then watch a live stream of the ceremony on your computer via the Hulu website, or on your phone, tablet or streaming device via the Hulu app.

If you can’t watch live, “Hulu with Live TV” also comes with 50 hours of Cloud DVR storage (with the ability to upgrade to “Enhanced Cloud DVR,” which gives you 200 hours of DVR space and the ability to fast forward through commercials).

Sling TV

ESPN is include in the “Sling Orange” channel package, while NFL Network is “Sling Blue” channel package. You can sign up for a free 7-day trial of either (or both), and you can then watch the ceremony live on your computer via the Sling website, or on your phone, tablet or streaming device via the Sling TV app.

If you can’t watch live, you can get 50 hours of cloud DVR storage as an additional add-on.


Pro Football Hall of Fame Class of 2018

Seven of the eight inductees will make their Hall of Fame speeches Saturday in Canton (in the order listed below), while Terrell Owens will do Terrell Owens things and forego the official enshrinement ceremony. Instead, he’ll make his speech at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. The Hall of Fame will still honor TO even though he’ll be absent.

Robert Brazile: The sixth overall pick by the Houston Oilers in the 1975 draft, “Dr. Doom” didn’t take long to live up to the lofty expectations, winning the AP Defensive Rookie of the Year award. The frightening linebacker would spend his entire career (’75-’84) with the Oilers, earning five first-team All-Pro nods and making seven Pro Bowl teams. Perhaps most impressively, though, he never missed a game throughout his entire career.

Bobby Beathard: A scout, general manager and director of player personnel, Beathard was a part of four Super Bowl champions: The 1972-73 Miami Dolphins (director of player personnel), the 73-74 Miami Dolphins (director of player personnel), the 82-83 Washington Redskins (general manager) and 87-88 Washington Redskins (general manager). He also made Super Bowl appearances while with the Kansas City Chiefs and San Diego Chargers.

Jerry Kramer: After being a Hall of Fame finalist for 10 years running prior to 2018, Kramer finally gets in. Not only did he anchor the offensive line for a Green Bay Packers team that won five championships–including wins in Super Bowl I and II–during his 11-year career, but he also spent time as the team’s placekicker, tallying 177 career points. That’s some kind of versatility.

Brian Urlacher: One of the greatest defensive players in the history of a franchise chalk-full of all-time greats, Urlacher spent his entire 13-year career with the Chicago Bears. During that time, he won the AP Defensive Rookie of the Year (2000), won AP Defensive Player of the Year (2005), was a five-time first-team All-Pro and was named to eight Pro Bowls.

Brian Dawkins: Dawkins spent the first 13 years of his career with the Philadelphia Eagles before finishing things off with three seasons with the Denver Broncos. One of the most feared safeties in the league for most of those years, he anchored the Eagles defense en route to eight playoff appearances, five conference championships and one Super Bowl, while adding another playoff showing with the Broncos. Dawk is the only player in NFL history with at least 25 sacks, 25 interceptions and 25 forced fumbles.

Randy Moss: An unprecedented blend of size, speed and freakish athleticism, Moss helped usher in the new era of physically dominant wide receivers. As close to literally unstoppable as you’ll get during his prime, he averaged an absurd 82 receptions, 1,306 receiving yards and 12.9 touchdowns per season in his seven years with the Minnesota Vikings. And after a mostly forgettable two years in Oakland, he enjoyed a career resurgence with Tom Brady and the Patriots, tallying 3,765 yards and 47 touchdowns–including a record 23 touchdown grabs in the 2007 season–between ’07 and ’09. He ranks 15th all-time in receptions (982), fourth in receiving yards (15,292) and second in receiving touchdowns (156).

Ray Lewis: Widely regarded as one of the greatest linebackers and defensive players of all-time, Lewis made 12 Pro Bowls, received eight first-team All-Pro nods, won the AP Defensive Player of the Year twice (2000, 2003), won two Super Bowls, was named MVP of Super Bowl XXXV, and served as the on-field and vocal leader for some of the most dominant defensive teams ever. Playing all 17 seasons with the Ravens, he became the only player in history to tally at least 40 sacks and 30 interceptions.

Terrell Owens: While he spent the largest stint of his career with the San Francisco 49ers (eight years), the always controversial TO also spent time with the Philadelphia Eagles, Dallas Cowboys, Buffalo Bills and Cincinnati Bengals. Many will remember his tirades and boisterous personality, but he always backed up the talk with his play on the field, racking up nine 1,000-yard receiving seasons and eight double-digit TD campaigns. He ranks eighth all-time in receptions (1,078), second in receiving yards (15,934) and fourth in touchdowns (156)–and has reason to be upset about it taking three years of eligibility to get elected into the Hall.

Source: Heavy Sports